CSSの特異性とCSSの重要なタグをいつ使用するか

CSSの特異性は、CSSを上手に使いたいかどうかを理解するための重要なトピックです。要素に適用されるスタイルを決定するのは、CSSセレクターに適用される一連のルールです。

これをよりよく理解するには、CSSでのカスケードという関連トピックを理解することが重要です。

CSSのカスケードの性質

CSSはカスケードスタイルシートを意味します。「カスケード」とは、CSSルールが要素適用される順序実際に重要であることを意味します。

理想的には、2つのルールが同じ要素に適用される場合、最後に来るものが使用されるものです。これを理解するために例を使用してみましょう。

要素に2つのクラスを適用し、各クラスに異なるを与えますbackground-color

This is a test paragraph

CSSは次のとおりです。

.style2 { background-color: red; } .style1 { background-color: yellow; }

結果は次のとおりです。

style1スタイルシートの最後にあるものが要素に適用されていることに注意してください。これは、CSSが要素にスタイルを適用する方法であると常に期待できますが、常にそうであるとは限りません。

この次の例を見てください。

This is a test paragraph

CSSは次のようになります。

#paragraph { background-color: red; } .style1 { background-color: yellow; }

要素にどのスタイルを適用する予定ですか?#paragraphまたは.style1

結果は次のとおりです。

最初のものが適用されていることに注意してください。#paragraphしながら、IDセレクタでstyle1クラスセレクタです。これは、カスケードが特定性を持って機能し、要素に適用される値を決定するためです。

では、CSSの特異性とは何ですか?

CSSの特異性の説明

MDNによると、特異性は、ブラウザがどのCSSプロパティ値が要素に最も関連性があり、したがって適用されるかを決定する手段です。

簡単に言えば、2つのCSSセレクターが同じ要素に適用される場合、より高い特異性を持つものが使用されます。

そのため、前の例では、idセレクターのプロパティ値が適用されました。これは、特異性の値が高いためです。

では、セレクターの特異性はどのように計算されますか?

特異性階層

セレクターの特異性の値を計算するのは非常に難しいです。これを計算する1つの方法は、ウェイトシステムを使用してさまざまなセレクターをランク付けし、階層を作成することです。

各セレクターのランク付けをよりよく理解できるように、各セレクターに重みを割り当てます。最小限から始めましょう。

要素と疑似要素

我々のような要素セレクタを使用してap、およびdivのような疑似要素ながら、スタイル選択された要素に::afterとは、::before要素のスタイルの特定の部分に使用されています。

 p { color: red; }  p::before { color: red; }

要素セレクターと疑似要素セレクターの特異性は最も低くなります。特異性重みシステムでは、値は1です。

クラス、属性、および疑似クラス

クラス、属性、および疑似クラスの例を次に示します。

 .person { color: red; }  [type="radio"] { color: red; }  :focus { color: red; }

それらは、要素および疑似要素セレクターよりも高い特異性を持っています。私たちの特異性重みシステムでは、それらの値は10です。

IDセレクター

IDセレクターは、要素のIDを使用して要素をターゲットにするために使用されます。

 #header { color: red; }

IDセレクターは、クラスや要素よりも高い特異性を持っています。私たちの特異性重みシステムでは、それらの値は100です。

インラインスタイル

インラインスタイルは、HTMLドキュメントの要素に直接適用されます。これは例です:

This is a paragraph

インラインスタイルは最も高い特異性を持っています。私たちの特異性重みシステムでは、それらの値は1000です。

重みの要約は次のとおりです。

Inline Styles - 1000 ID selectors - 100 Classes, Attributes and Pseudo-classes - 10 Elements and Pseudo-elements - 1 

それを理解してみましょう。

The property values of selectors with a higher weight will always be applied over a selector with a lower weight.

Inline styles have the highest weight and their property value overrides every other selector's value applied to an element.

For example, if we have an element and for the same property color, there's an inline style. If the class and id selectors also have values for the same property, the inline style wins.

This is a paragraph

The stylesheet:

#paragraph { color: green; } .yellow { color: yellow; }

This is the result:

The same thing happens when an ID selector and class selector have values for the same property. The property value of the ID selector will apply.

Note that the weights only apply when different selectors have values for the same property.

Multiple Element Selectors

There are times when more than one selector is used to target an element. For example, for a list like this:

  • First item
  • Second item
  • Third item

You may target the list items like this:

.list > li { color: green; }

or like this:

ul > li { color: red; }

In a case where both selectors are used on the same stylesheet, which style will be applied to the list items?

Let's go back to our weight system to calculate the specificity of both selectors.

For .list > li, the weight of one class selector is 10 and the weight of an element selector is 1. Combined their sum is 11.

For ul > li, the weight of one element selector is 1. There are two element selectors used, so their sum is 2.

Which of the color values do you will think will be applied?

If you said the color of the .list>li selector will be applied, you got it right. It has a higher specificity value than the other selector.

Let's try another example. Given this element:

This is a paragraph

and these styles

#div-1 > .second-block > .text { color: blue } .first-block > #div-2 > #paragraph { color: red }

Try to calculate the specificity and guess which color value will apply.

This is the result:

Let's use our weight system to understand why the color value of the second selector is applied.

For #div-1 > .second-block > .text, we have one ID selector and two class selectors. The sum of their weights is 100 + 10 + 10 = 120.

For .first-block > #div-2 > #paragraph, we have one class selector and two ID selectors. The sum of their weights is 10 + 100 + 100 = 210.

That's why the value of latter selector is used.

You can try this example on your own to be sure that you get the hang of it.

  • First item

Which color will be applied to the span if the following styles are in the stylesheet?

div#div1 > .first-list > #list-item > span { color: red; } #list > #list-item > #span { color: purple; } #div1 > #list > .first-list-item > .first-span { color: light-blue; }

Try to calculate the specificity and compare it with the result you get when you run the code.

Before we conclude this article, there are some important points to note.

Important Points about CSS Specificity

The weight assigned to a selector just gives us an idea of which rules get applied to an element. However, this does not always suffice.

For instance, you may assume that if you use more than 10 classes (weight >= 100) to target an element, the property values will override that of one ID selector. But this is not true. As long as the selector with more than 10 classes have no ID selector, the one ID selector will always take precedence over it.

Applying !important to the property value of any selector makes it the value that will be applied to the element. This happens regardless of the rank of the selector on the Specificity hierarchy.

Let's use an example to understand this.

This is a paragraph

If the following styles are applied

p { color: red !important; } .blue { color: blue; } #paragraph { color: purple; }

The value of the element selector p will be used because of the !important attached to the value.

However, if another selector has the !important tag attached to the same property, the value of the later selector is used.

That's why !important should be avoided because it makes it difficult override a style.

Generally, to style a specific element, it is more advisable to use a class. This makes it easier to override the styles if you ever need to do so.

Summary

From this article, we can see that CSS specificity is an important topic to understand because it can save you hours of debugging.

With this knowledge, you can easily find out why your styles are not being applied.

Here are the major points to take out of this article:

  • Due to the cascading nature of CSS, if two rules are applied to the same element, the one that comes last is the one that will be used.
  • CSS specificity is a set of rules that determine which style is applied to an element.
  • The weight system is one way of calculating the specificity of different selectors. Here's a summary of the weights:
Inline Styles - 1000 ID selectors - 100 Classes, Attributes and Pseudo-classes - 10 Elements and Pseudo-elements - 1 
  • !important overrides all other styles regardless of the specificity of the selector where it is used.

I hope you enjoyed reading this article.